Updated: NCAA announces it will not renew licensing contract with EA Sports

Updated: NCAA announces it will not renew licensing contract with EA Sports

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NCAA 2014 was recently released in the middle of an ongoing lawsuit between the Ed O’Bannon plaintiffs and co-defendents, and as it turns out, that will be the last game ever under the NCAA name.

The NCAA announced it will not renew the EA Sports contract.

The NCAA has made the decision not to enter a new contract for the license of its name and logo for the EA Sports NCAA Football video game. The current contract expires in June 2014, but our timing is based on the need to provide EA notice for future planning. As a result, the NCAA Football 2014 video game will be the last to include the NCAA’s name and logo. We are confident in our legal position regarding the use of our trademarks in video games. But given the current business climate and costs of litigation, we determined participating in this game is not in the best interests of the NCAA.

The NCAA has never licensed the use of current student-athlete names, images or likenesses to EA. The NCAA has no involvement in licenses between EA and former student-athletes. Member colleges and universities license their own trademarks and other intellectual property for the video game. They will have to independently decide whether to continue those business arrangements in the future.

It’s unclear what the future holds for the video game franchise, but the official name “NCAA Football” is no more.

The Ed O’Bannon case is awaiting a class-certification ruling that will determine if current athletes will be in a position to get paid from the use of their ‘likeness’.

NCAA Football 14 could theoretically be the last college sports video game ever. EA Sports should still have a CFB video game beyond 2014, but it certainly won’t be affiliated with the NCAA.

Update:

The name of the new came will be College Football 15.





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Comment 1

  1. Isn’t the College Football Playoff a separate entity from the NCAA? If so, I’d name the game after that.