Physically imposing: Rookie Montez Sweat already being compared to Julius Peppers in Washington

By the sounds of it, Montez Sweat has made an immediate impression on his new Washington teammates.

The 16th overall selection in the 2019 NFL Draft out of Mississippi State is currently going through his first camp with the Redskins and already he’s being compared to one of the best players in recent NFL history — at least physically.

Washington’s veteran linebacker Ryan Kerrigan was a recent guest on the John Keim Report and when asked about Sweat, the longtime Redskin defender could not hide his excitement when discussing how impressed he was when he first met the team’s rookie defender. Here is what Kerrigan had to say when Keim asked him to share his initial impression of Sweat.

“Just his size, he’s an imposing dude. I mean, the one person that came to mind – and this isn’t a playing thing, but like, Julius Peppers,” Kerrigan said on the show. “I remember meeting Julius Peppers and seeing how big he was in person. I’m like, ‘Oh my gosh, that dude is big!’ That was kinda my first impression of (Sweat), in terms of size. And then to know how fast and athletic he is too, it’s pretty remarkable.

“One thing I respect about him too, he has the production to match. You see a lot of guys that get drafted and you see their clips and you are like, ‘Oh, you only had a couple of sacks in his career? Why is he getting picked so high?’ Montez has the production to match his freakish athletic ability, which I think is key.”

Kerrigan has certainly done his homework on the former Bulldog as Sweat was a revelation for the Mississippi State defense in recent seasons. In just two seasons on the field, Sweat registered 30 tackles for loss and 22.5 sacks with 101 overall tackles. If he comes close to matching that level of production early during his first two seasons in Washington, the next rookie sensation coming into the league may get compared to Sweat instead of soon-to-be Hall of Famer Julius Peppers.

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