The second week of football in the SEC got pretty chippy at times.

Between all the Oklahoma-Tennessee chirping and four different targeting ejections, the testosterone was running high on fields across the Southeast.

There also were several close calls involving fumbles and interceptions.

Check out some of the plays we think were the most questionable from the Week 2 action.

(NEAR) REVERSAL OF FORTUNE

Perry Orth threw what appeared to be a game-sealing interception with less than five minutes remaining. But South Carolina cornerback Rico McWilliams tried to strip Chris Westry and did get the ball out, but the officials ruled that Westry was down prior to the strip.

There wasn’t enough video evidence to overturn the call, but it appears the referees got the call right.

NOTHING TO SEE HERE

Auburn narrowly avoided an upset against FCS school Jacksonville State. But the Tigers managed to win with the help of this 51-yard touchdown pass to Roc Thomas in the third quarter.

Gamecocks fans, the few that exist, probably are upset that the officials missed a pretty blatant hold on Auburn offensive tackle Shon Coleman.

But, as they say, there could be a holding call on every play.

ALL THAT EFFORT FOR NOTHING

Arkansas defensive back Rohan Gaines went horizontal extension in the second quarter while attempting to make an interception, allowing his body to bounce off the ground uncushioned while tapping his foot.

Unfortunately for the Razorbacks, the officials eventually ruled that Gaines did not maintain possession of the football as he crashed to the ground. In a game where every break mattered, Arkansas could’ve used this one.

ROBBED OF A FUMBLE

East Carolina quarterback Blake Kemp found himself in a precarious position during the second quarter Saturday.

Florida end Jordan Sherit grabbed his legs and was swinging Kemp’s momentum like a pendulum, veering his body from its original North-South orientation. As Kemp’s body swung, he exposed the ball, and another Gators defender jammed it loose.

The officials ruled Kemp down before the fumble, but it sure looked like the Pirates quarterback lost the ball first.

THE EXCUSE THAT WASN’T NEEDED

It’s not easy to see from the Vine below. But late in the third quarter, with Oklahoma trying to mount a comeback in Neyland Stadium, the Sooners sacked Tennessee quarterback Joshua Dobbs.

In the process, while Dobbs’ body still was suspended, an OU player ripped out the ball, and the Sooners scooped it up and went the other way for six. Only an official had blown the play dead, negating the fumble as well as the return.

If the Volunteers had won, the Sooners probably would’ve whined about this one.

EJECTION, PART I

As if the Auburn secondary wasn’t shorthanded enough without Tray Matthews and Joshua Holsey (injuries), Blake Countess added to the throng of defensive backs out of the game when he committed this pretty obvious targeting penalty and got ejected from the game.

At least no one got hurt.

EJECTION, PART II

There wasn’t any video footage available for this play early Sunday morning. But Georgia linebacker Lorenzo Carter drove his head into the face of Vanderbilt quarterback Johnny McCrary, knocking the quarterback’sĀ helmet off and earning an automatic ejection.

EJECTION, PART III

Ole Miss cornerback Tee Shepard also got ejected for a targeting call. He hammered a Fresno State receiver on a vicious hit.

This is the worst instance or targeting this week, and not just because the hit probably was the most violent — because it took place in the third quarter, Shepard will have to miss the first half of next week’s game at Alabama. That’s not great news for the Ole Miss Landshark defense.

EJECTION, PART IV

A Middle Tennessee State player got ejected for a helmet-to-helmet clubbing of Alabama quarterback Cooper Bateman after the Crimson Tide player had initiated a slide.

It’s plays like these that illustrate why there’s a targeting rule in place. There’s no room for hits like that in college football.